Textpraxis #16 Cover

Textpraxis # 16

1.2019

In this issue, Christina Glinik and Elmar Lenhart investigate writing scenes in Josef Winkler’s Domra. Sandra Folie discusses new world literature through the lens of intersectionality, while Stefan Tomasek discusses the museal presentation of the Song of the Nibelungs. 

Theories of Literary Study
ChristinaGlinikElmarLenhart
Josef Winklers »Domra« aus textgenetischer Perspektive

The vast extend of archived material from Josef Winkler's 1996 novel Domra gives researchers another opportunity to apply the methods of the critique génétique. This paper focuses on two passages of the novel in its eight handwritten and typographic versions. These versions are analysed by means of close reading. We intend to show that an increase of fictionalisation of the autobiographical substrate can be identified in Josef Winkler’s creative writing process, especially in writing scenes (Schreib-Szenen). The paper takes on the perspective of autobiographical research but is also located at the intersection between writing process research and writing scene research.

Literature and Society
SandraFolie
An Intersectional Perspective on »New World Literature«

In recent years, feminist, queer, and postcolonial literary critics and activists have demonstrated that neither the literary market nor literary studies are free of class, ethnic, gender, national, racial, and other prejudices. With a view to the literary market, this article will identify so-called »inner and outer gatekeepers« to explore to what extent Euro- and Androcentrism are still present in current world literature discourses. Against the backdrop of White men’s dominance in the field of »old« world literature, it will examine whether »new« world literature is by implication a »Black female affair«.

Literary Studies and Praxis
StefanTomasek
Kriemhild und das Nibelungenmuseum in Worms

Taking the example of the Museum for the Song of the Nibelungs in Worms as a case study, Stefan Tomasek examines the museum presentation of the Song of the Nibelungs. The article is questioning the assumption that popular mediators are more effective in transferring knowledge about Middle High texts than the actual text reading can be. This can, in part, be exampled by the fact that in the Wormser museum the Nibelungenlied is presented as a text in a three-dimensional space. Relevant are thus the spatial arrangement of exhibits, the didactic control of the recipients and the transmission of textual knowledge. The article discussed in detail which parts of the Song of the Nibelungs are (re-)told in the museum and how the relation of the newly narrated text to the medieval textual tradition is shaped; moreover, it shows how and on which levels of mediation the (new) text is presented in the museum.

Editorial

In issue #16 of Textpraxis. Digital Journal for Philology, Christina Glinik and Elmar Lenhart use Josef Winkler´s Domra to discusses possibilities of presenting the writing process in prose while demonstrating that the materialities in Domra enable a modeling of the literary writing process. In her article, Sandra Folie argues that neither the literary market nor literary studies are free of class, ethnic, gender, national, racial, and other prejudices. She identifies so-called »inner and outer gatekeepers« to explore to what extent Euro- and Androcentrism are still present in current world literature discourses. Moreover, Stefan Tomasek examines museal presentation and (re-)telling of the Song of the Nibelungs to investigate how the relation of the newly narrated text to the medieval textual tradition is shaped. 

 

Many thanks go to our external reviewers Theo D’haen from Leuven, Kerstin Klein from Lübeck, and Davide Giuriato from Zurich, for editing and providing critiques to our authors. Many thanks for your time and efforts! 

With this issue, three of our long-term members unfortunately leave the editorial team: Julia Albers, Kerstin Mertenskötter, and Elisabeth Zimmermann. All three contributed decisively and with great engagement to the conception and successful implementation of »Textpraxis« for many years. We would like to thank all of them for their efforts, and we wish them all the best and much success in their future endeavors! 
At the same time, we are happy to welcome Aaron Carpenter (German Studies, WWU Münster), Akshay Chavan (Postcolonial Studies, WWU Münster) as well as Christina Becher (German Studies, University of Cologne) to the editorial board.  

 

We hope that you will enjoy reading this issue of Textpraxis, and as always, encourage you to submit response articles or provide comments to the newly published articles. 

 

Your Textpraxis Editorial Team 

Imprint

Textpraxis#16 (1.2019) was published on May 1, 2019.  

 

Editorial Team: 

Sona Arasteh-Roodsary 
Ina Batzke 
Christina Becher 
Aaron Carpenter 
Akshay Chavan 
Lea Espinoza Garrido 
Thomas Kater 
Kerstin Mertenskötter 
Laura Reiling 
Janneke Schoene 
Levke Teßmann 
Elisabeth Zimmermann 

 

Reviewers: 

 

Prof. Dr. Theo D’haen (Leuven) 
Prof. Dr. Davide Giuriato (Zurich) 

Kerstin Klein (Lübeck) 

 

Cover: Felicia Dürbusch 

ISSN 2191-8236